Friday, February 4, 2011

How About School Choice for Everyone?

Please visit this article's new home at AriArmstrong.com. Thank you!

3 comments:

  1. Vouchers are *anti*-liberty. It sounds good to say that people should be able to use their money as they see fit, but what does its use entail? More government control of private schools.

    We already have school vouchers in a major sector of American education: higher education. Federal student financial aid, in the form of loans and grants, is now ubiquitous.

    Once a school accepts federal aid, it is obligated to comply with a variety of federal regulations, everything from anti-discrimination requirements to Title IX athletic regulations, and everywhere in between.

    At least in higher education, there is a tradition of "academic freedom," which gives professors nominal control over the curriculum. But in publicly funded K-12 education, states have long exercised curriculum oversight. Do you really want to see that oversight extended to private K-12 schools?

    The only hope for education in America is a competitive private K-12 alternative that is completely unfettered by the latest educational methodology fads, such as are usually mandated in public schools. We see this today in the success of schools like the Van Damme Academy and the LePort schools. This innovation would not last long if private schools began to rely on federal funding, and took the strings that would inevitably be attached.

    Perhaps you mean only to be arguing for something like tax credits for education, which might not entail the same amount of likely government control over curriculum. But vouchers, at least as they are typically touted by conservatives, offer no barrier to the kind of abuse I cite above.

    Indeed it is not characteristic of conservatives to tout anything other than vouchers, because mostwant to control schools in line with conservative--i.e., usually religious--ideology. Michelle Malkin is no exception.

    NS

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  2. "The basic problem with vouchers is that they spend tax money on otherwise private schools, which might teach controversial ideas like religion."

    Controversial ideas such as evolution.

    We will never agree so why not less us choose what is best for our children?

    If you refuse to fund parochial education then please sponsor a bill that would allow me to opt out of your secular, satanic school system.

    I pay for your hell school via property taxes, vehicle taxes and a myriad of other streams.

    Please allow me to completely opt out.

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  3. Dear March 17 Anonymous, You might help your case by first not sounding crazy. My "secular, satanic" schools? Come on, dude. (I would not ordinarily have posted such a ludicrous comment, except I thought it worth illustrating how insane the religious right often sounds.) And, if you'd bother to actually read the article before posting a comment, you might notice that I do in fact want to allow you to stop funding secular schools. -Ari

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